Articulate for kids rules for dating

articulate for kids rules for dating

My 4.5 year old son is strong willed. He is not a child who is naturally compliant. He tests tests and tests some more. He needs firm, clear boundaries. My problem is what to do when he tests them because he will!

He misbehaves at the dinner table (throws food for example and laughs), I say "food is not for throwing, it's for eating. If you throw your food again dinner is over."

He throws the food. I tell him dinner is over and remove his plate. he gets mad and starts crying and will hit me. He knows hitting is not allowed and there are no warnings its an automatic cool down. So I put him on the stairs (his cool down spot) and tell him he needs to cool off for 4 minutes. Inevitably he will not stay on the stairs. He will get up laughing and run away. I go get him and put him back on the stairs. This will go on for anywhere from a few minutes to 20-30 minutes. in between there is additional hitting and tantruming sometimes. It's exhausting.

I find it very confusing as I've purchased multiple books and they all seem to advocate a different approach. I have not and will never use physical punishment, but relying on just reinforcing positive behavior because children really just want to please their parents doesn't resonate with me either. My child needs the boundaries and there has to be some consequences for crossing the line doesn't there?

It is so frustrating when you have a strong-willed child who just will not cooperate. And it is even more upsetting when you read parenting books and the "experts" suggest contradictory strategies!

Most parenting books are based on the punishment model. You tell the child to correct their behavior, hopefully you reward them if they do it, and of course you punish them if they don't do it, to convince them to "do right" in the future. So if your child goes against your rules -- or in your words, "crosses the line" -- you punish them.

I have never seen any research on this, but my completely unofficial estimate based on my experience with parents and kids is that for probably 60-70% of kids, you can raise them with conventional parenting, including rewards and punishment, and they seem to come out more or less okay.  The other 30-40% of kids are more challenging to parent for one reason or another. Some of them have special challenges like sensory issues, or health issues, or they are on the spectrum. 

Others, like your son, are simply what we call very "strong-willed." For those strong-willed kids, it's an affront to their integrity to comply with threats. They regard conventional parenting with its threats and punishments as an attempt to intimidate them (which of course it is) and they refuse to be intimidated. These strong-willed kids are what I call the "Cool Hand Luke" kids. They refuse to be pushed around; they see themselves standing up against that lack of respect. Of course, they will comply with what you ask if they feel connected and understood, just because they love you. But they will not back down from a threat.  

Children are not born with a natural aversion to reading. We know that. We see what happens when we introduce toddlers to books. They fall in love. They carry their favorites around and admire the pictures over and over again.

Why, then, is reading such a problem for so many elementary and secondary students? What turns so many little book lovers into adamant book haters? Instead of speculating, I went straight to the source—real-life reluctant readers in my classes spanning the past two decades.

One day, at the start of my English class, I asked, “How many of you like reading?” A few students raised their hands tentatively. Then I asked, “How many hate reading?” A sea of hands waved wildly, churning up the air with their negativity. We then spent the entire class period discussing our feelings about books and reading.

I worked hard to convince those students that reading was a skill, not a natural-born talent, and that they were capable of learning. I offered the analogies of basketball, since many of the boys were NBA hopefuls.

Because we had developed a solid rapport based on mutual respect and trust, those students agreed to give reading one more try. Together, we created a new set of expectations and rules about reading.

With each new high school class, I kept the discussion about reading as one of our introductory activities. Later, when I began tutoring young struggling readers, I asked the same questions: How did you learn to read? Did you ever enjoy it? Why do you hate it now? The same answers cropped up time and again. Here are the reasons students offered to explain their aversion to reading and some possible solutions.

Do this: Recent research suggests that nearly half of people who are labeled as learning disabled actually suffer from scotopic (light) sensitivity. People with light sensitivity find reading difficult and sometimes painful when the material is printed on glossy paper. Fluorescent lighting or other lights that cause glare on the page make reading even more difficult. High-contrast print, such as black letters on white paper, is the most difficult for light-sensitive people to read. Unfortunately, such high-contrast print is the most common format for texts and other school materials.

Many course authors are interested to know the key differences between the top e-Learning authoring tools on the market. We surveyed e-Learning developers about their experiences with the popular e-Learning authoring software Articulate Storyline 2 and Adobe Captivate 9, and compared their feature sets with iSpring Suite 8.1.

Each of the compared tools is well-suited for a particular type of content authoring. Some users prefer to work within the familiar PowerPoint interface, while others require more complex functionality and are comfortable with standalone authoring software and a new interface.

Professional e-Learning content developers often have all three of these tools, and use each of them periodically for different tasks: iSpring Suite for rapid content development, and Articulate and Adobe for complex content development. 

Below, you’ll find a comparison chart of Articulate Storyline 2 vs Adobe Captivate 9 vs iSpring Suite 8.1. It reviews their specific features and functionality, allowing you to understand what type of e-Learning content can be created with each tool. Further down is a brief overview of each product, with a list of pros and cons for each one. 

Standalone software that allows users to develop interactive courses with triggers, variables and layers. Has a unique feature of converting text to speech, which is convenient for creating voice-overs. Content can be created for various devices, but not all the materials adapt to mobile devices: you need to select a Responsive Project for that, and there’s no opportunity to make imported PowerPoint presentations adaptive. Requires a steep learning curve to master the tool. Sometimes bugs may occur.

Standalone software that allows users to develop interactive courses with triggers, variables and layers. The interface is similar to that of PowerPoint, which makes the navigation easy. Also has some basic effects similar to those of Microsoft PowerPoint. The created content doesn’t adapt to mobile devices (it is displayed the same way as on desktop only scaled down), which makes it difficult to interact with the content on mobile devices.

iSpring Suite works as a PowerPoint add-in, which makes it very easy to use. Since almost no learning curve is required, content developers can immediately start using all the tool’s features. iSpring Suite has a built-in QuizMaker, Conversation Simulator and other tools that enhance PowerPoint presentations. The software preserves all the original PowerPoint effects when publishing to Flash, HTML5, and video. The adaptive player allows users to create content for various mobile devices. There are few interactions and no variables, but the software works steadily and the output content is of high quality.



Seize | Seize Definition by Merriam-Webster

Children are not born with a natural aversion to reading. We know that. We see what happens when we introduce toddlers to books. They fall in love. They carry their favorites around and admire the pictures over and over again.

Why, then, is reading such a problem for so many elementary and secondary students? What turns so many little book lovers into adamant book haters? Instead of speculating, I went straight to the source—real-life reluctant readers in my classes spanning the past two decades.

One day, at the start of my English class, I asked, “How many of you like reading?” A few students raised their hands tentatively. Then I asked, “How many hate reading?” A sea of hands waved wildly, churning up the air with their negativity. We then spent the entire class period discussing our feelings about books and reading.

I worked hard to convince those students that reading was a skill, not a natural-born talent, and that they were capable of learning. I offered the analogies of basketball, since many of the boys were NBA hopefuls.

Because we had developed a solid rapport based on mutual respect and trust, those students agreed to give reading one more try. Together, we created a new set of expectations and rules about reading.

With each new high school class, I kept the discussion about reading as one of our introductory activities. Later, when I began tutoring young struggling readers, I asked the same questions: How did you learn to read? Did you ever enjoy it? Why do you hate it now? The same answers cropped up time and again. Here are the reasons students offered to explain their aversion to reading and some possible solutions.

Do this: Recent research suggests that nearly half of people who are labeled as learning disabled actually suffer from scotopic (light) sensitivity. People with light sensitivity find reading difficult and sometimes painful when the material is printed on glossy paper. Fluorescent lighting or other lights that cause glare on the page make reading even more difficult. High-contrast print, such as black letters on white paper, is the most difficult for light-sensitive people to read. Unfortunately, such high-contrast print is the most common format for texts and other school materials.