Girl meets world black nerd twitter

girl meets world black nerd twitter

In a Season 2 episode of "Girl Meets World," Disney Channel's spin-off of the beloved original series, two "Boys Meets World" characters will return . Trina McGee -- who played Angela Moore, girlfriend to Shawn (Rider Strong) -- will return in the episode “Girl Meets Hurricane" along with Blake Clark, who was Shawn's father, Chet Hunter.

"Boy Meets World" fans will remember the heartbreaking goodbye between Angela and Shawn when she decided to travel to Europe with her father at the end of Season 7. Moments before she left, Shawn implied that he was going to propose to Angela, but she cut him off before he got the chance to ask.

We know that present-day Shawn in "Girl Meets World" has been traveling the world as a writer and photographer, so perhaps this is the first time he and Angela will reunite again. "Girl" executive producer Michael Jacobs told ET Online, "We know that [Shawn's] relationship with Angela Moore was a very important relationship to the audience, but we also know something more which is that with Shawn, nothing good ever really happened to him." Here's to hoping he finally gets the love he deserves.

Fans will also remember Shawn's father, Chet, who was absent for most of his son's life until he died from a heart attack in Season 6. Chet still appeared in the series periodically in Shawn's memories and subconscious and is expected to return in "Girl Meets World" in a similar way. But if you're still craving more "Boy Meets World" nostalgia, have no fear -- Eric Matthews (Will Friedle) will also return for Season 2. Bring on the tears!

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Much like its predecessor, Girl Meets World did a lot of growing up between Seasons 1 and 2 and took bigger risks with its storylines, while examining more serious subject matter. At the same time, this season stuck to the core playfulness of both the previous season and previous series , and also developed the characters in unique and pivotal ways. Admittedly, some storylines worked better than others, but Season 2 nevertheless broke new ground.

For one thing, this season seemed to cut back on more of the "Disney Channely" moments -- that is, cheesy and over-the-top material specifically geared towards children. Not to say there was none of that this year. All of Auggie's storylines and that godawful tater tot puppet spring to mind. It didn't help that some episodes aired out of order and felt jarringly out of place -- e.g., "Girl Meets Commonism" and "Girl Meets Fish" from Season 1.

In their place, though, we got something arguably worse: a dragged-out love triangle between Riley, Maya and Lucas, which, initially, I was on board with. Once Carpenter and Meyer showed they had more chemistry than Blanchard and Meyer in Season 1, it only made sense that the writers would want to course-correct the characters' romantic trajectory in Season 2. They even introduced all-around good guy Charlie Gardner as a way of phasing Riley out of her thing with Lucas.

Unfortunately, Season 2 's big Texas arc messed up that transition by putting a spotlight on the love triangle. "Texas: Part 3" could have easily settled the issue then and there, but instead it began a long and insufferable "will they, won't they" that lasted through New Year's and into the season finale -- and, alas, it will continue into Season 3 as well.

Look, the fact that there is a love triangle isn't the problem; it's how poorly it was handled throughout the year. Over the course of the season, all three characters came off as melodramatic, indecisive and, worst of all, desperate for attention. Really, I just felt bad for Farkle -- horn-blower though he was -- and newcomer Zay, who had to witness this three-ring circus from the sidelines. Heck, not even Lucas had much say in what went on between Riley and Maya. In retrospect, it was all just noise that didn't need to happen .

Still, there were plenty of storylines that weren't romance-centric, enough that Season 2 was never outright unwatchable. Farkle, for instance, really came into his own this year with episodes like "Girl Meets I Am Farkle" and "Girl Meets Money," which progressed his character in realistic and relatable ways. And when Riley, Maya and Lucas weren't obsessing over who liked who, they too had standout storylines in "Girl Meets Yearbook," "The Forgiveness Project" and "The Secret Life," respectively.

Season 2 also featured some great Boy Meets World tie-ins, like "Mr. Squirrels Goes to Washington" (the Eric/Tommy episode), "Hurricane" (the Angela episode), "Semi-Formal" (the Eric/Jack episode) and "Pluto" (the Feeny episode). Granted, there were fewer of these callbacks than last year, but ultimately I think that was for the best. Season 2 was about developing the five main kids, and for better or for worse that was the only route that made sense, as the next generation continued to find their way.

The Matthews family and Shawn visit for Christmas. Topanga tries to impress Amy with her cooking while Riley tries to work on her relationship with Shawn.

9.5 Rate this     1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 9.5 / 10 X  

Topanga is offered promotion at work to run her law firm's London office. While Topanga tries to make the right decision for The Matthews family, Riley and her friend struggle with what may happen if...

9.4 Rate this     1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 9.4 / 10 X  

Uncle Eric is recruited to run for the Senate, but learns it was only because they expected him to lose. Riley and her friends rally together to help his campaign.

9.2 Rate this     1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 9.2 / 10 X  

Liv, a popular television star whose show has just finished its run, and Maddie, an outstanding student and school basketball star whose popularity is on the rise until Liv makes a return to their high school.



Girl Meets World - Official Site

Much like its predecessor, Girl Meets World did a lot of growing up between Seasons 1 and 2 and took bigger risks with its storylines, while examining more serious subject matter. At the same time, this season stuck to the core playfulness of both the previous season and previous series , and also developed the characters in unique and pivotal ways. Admittedly, some storylines worked better than others, but Season 2 nevertheless broke new ground.

For one thing, this season seemed to cut back on more of the "Disney Channely" moments -- that is, cheesy and over-the-top material specifically geared towards children. Not to say there was none of that this year. All of Auggie's storylines and that godawful tater tot puppet spring to mind. It didn't help that some episodes aired out of order and felt jarringly out of place -- e.g., "Girl Meets Commonism" and "Girl Meets Fish" from Season 1.

In their place, though, we got something arguably worse: a dragged-out love triangle between Riley, Maya and Lucas, which, initially, I was on board with. Once Carpenter and Meyer showed they had more chemistry than Blanchard and Meyer in Season 1, it only made sense that the writers would want to course-correct the characters' romantic trajectory in Season 2. They even introduced all-around good guy Charlie Gardner as a way of phasing Riley out of her thing with Lucas.

Unfortunately, Season 2 's big Texas arc messed up that transition by putting a spotlight on the love triangle. "Texas: Part 3" could have easily settled the issue then and there, but instead it began a long and insufferable "will they, won't they" that lasted through New Year's and into the season finale -- and, alas, it will continue into Season 3 as well.

Look, the fact that there is a love triangle isn't the problem; it's how poorly it was handled throughout the year. Over the course of the season, all three characters came off as melodramatic, indecisive and, worst of all, desperate for attention. Really, I just felt bad for Farkle -- horn-blower though he was -- and newcomer Zay, who had to witness this three-ring circus from the sidelines. Heck, not even Lucas had much say in what went on between Riley and Maya. In retrospect, it was all just noise that didn't need to happen .

Still, there were plenty of storylines that weren't romance-centric, enough that Season 2 was never outright unwatchable. Farkle, for instance, really came into his own this year with episodes like "Girl Meets I Am Farkle" and "Girl Meets Money," which progressed his character in realistic and relatable ways. And when Riley, Maya and Lucas weren't obsessing over who liked who, they too had standout storylines in "Girl Meets Yearbook," "The Forgiveness Project" and "The Secret Life," respectively.

Season 2 also featured some great Boy Meets World tie-ins, like "Mr. Squirrels Goes to Washington" (the Eric/Tommy episode), "Hurricane" (the Angela episode), "Semi-Formal" (the Eric/Jack episode) and "Pluto" (the Feeny episode). Granted, there were fewer of these callbacks than last year, but ultimately I think that was for the best. Season 2 was about developing the five main kids, and for better or for worse that was the only route that made sense, as the next generation continued to find their way.