Hiv positive dating sites canada

hiv positive dating sites canada

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Over the decades, there have been several public figures who have not only come out into public, but also managed to live a long life despite the life-threatening disease. In conclusion, being diagnosed with HIV doesn’t mean that it’s te end of the world. The following celebrities have proven so by being an inspiration choosing to use their fame to discuss their HIV status and to advocate for compassion and awareness around HIV, hoping to help others to do the same.  Here are 5 of them.

In a 2011 interview with DRUM  magazine, Bala spoke openly about living with HIV. He said he had received the diagnosis in 2010 and had made a commitment to help others in the same situation. He however died of cancer in 2015.

“I am HIV-positive, and as a celebrity and someone who is openly gay, it is important to come out. I want to use my bubbly personality to help those struggling to come to terms with their status and instil a sense of hope.”

Radio DJ Criselda Kananda, was diagnosed HIV positive more than 13 years ago, when she was seven months pregnant. Today she is a mother of 3, motivational speaker, professional counsellor, former nurse, medical underwriter and serves on the board of the South African National AIDS Council.

Lesego Motsepe who for 10 years played Lettie Matabane in Isidingo, disclosed her status on World AIDS Day in 2011. She said “Our society had made this virus a monster and all it is, is a virus. I’m doing it for the voiceless people out there who just found out today, and know that I’ve got their back.” Sadly Motsepe stopped using life-saving ARVs in 2012. She died in 2014.

Gospel artist Musa ‘Queen’ Njoko publicly disclosed her HIV-positive status in 1995. She was 22 when she was diagnosed, at a time when treatment was not available in South Africa. She faced a lot of stigma and hostility but also found support.

Former footballer, Thabang Sefatsa made headlines  when he confessed to being HIV positive, and he revealed the reason why more players don’t speak out.

The United Kingdom (UK) has a relatively small HIV epidemic, with an estimated 101,200 people living with HIV in 2015. This equates to an HIV prevalence of 1.6 per 1,000 people aged 15 and over. 1 In the same year, 6,095 people were newly diagnosed with HIV and 594 people died of AIDS-related illnesses. 2

In 2015, 96% of people living with HIV were receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART). 3 However, late diagnosis of HIV remains a key challenge in this country, despite declining rates.

Although the figure for undiagnosed cases has fallen by 11% since the estimate of 24% in 2014, it still means that around 13,500 people are unaware of their infection, despite testing and treatment for HIV being free and universally available in the UK.

The annual number of new diagnoses – 6,095 people – represents a notably high rate of 11.3 per 100,000 people. Western Europe’s average is 6.3 per 100,000.

The epidemic in the UK mainly affects men who have sex with men and black African women. But in its 2016 report, Public Health England emphasised the diversity of people living with HIV in the UK. In 2015, for the first time since the 1990s, the proportion of people diagnosed with HIV who were born in the UK (52%) exceeded the proportion born abroad (48%).[ 4

Since the 1980s, men who have sex with men have remained the group most at risk of HIV in the UK. In 2014, the most recent data available, an estimated 45,000 men who have sex with men were living with HIV. This means roughly 1 in 20 men who have sex with men aged 15 to 44 are living with the virus. 5 The prevalence rate is 4.9% nationally among this group, rising to 9% in London. 6

In 2014, men who have sex with men aged between 25 and 44 years old accounted for two-thirds of new diagnoses. 6% were over 55 at the time of their diagnosis. Over half (51%) of these new diagnoses were made in London. Four out of five men who have sex with men newly diagnosed with HIV were white (81%), 2% were black African, 2% black Caribbean and 14% described as other/mixed race. 8

Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men a made up an estimated 2% of the population but 55% of people living with HIV in the United States in 2013. If current diagnosis rates continue, 1 in 6 gay and bisexual men will be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetime, including 1 in 2 black/African American b gay and bisexual men, 1 in 4 Hispanic/Latino c gay and bisexual men, and 1 in 11 white gay and bisexual men. But these rates are not inevitable. We have more tools to prevent HIV than ever before.

Although HIV diagnoses increased among gay and bisexual men overall from 2005 to 2014—and increased sharply among African American and Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men—diagnoses overall have stabilized in more recent years:

CDC supports Capacity Building Assistance for High-Impact HIV Prevention , a national program that addresses gaps in each step of the HIV care continuum by providing training and technical assistance for health departments, CBOs, and health care organizations. The estimated annual funding is $22 million.

CDC supports biomedical approaches to HIV prevention. People at very high risk for HIV can take PrEP to greatly reduce the chances that they will get HIV. Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), which involves beginning a regimen of HIV medicines soon after possible exposure to HIV, also plays a role in HIV prevention, but should be not be considered a primary means of prevention.

Through its Act Against AIDS campaigns and partnerships, CDC provides gay and bisexual men with effective and culturally appropriate messages about HIV prevention and treatment. For example,

HIV Prevention among Black/African American Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men: Highlights of Activities of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention



HIV - Wikipedia

Over the decades, there have been several public figures who have not only come out into public, but also managed to live a long life despite the life-threatening disease. In conclusion, being diagnosed with HIV doesn’t mean that it’s te end of the world. The following celebrities have proven so by being an inspiration choosing to use their fame to discuss their HIV status and to advocate for compassion and awareness around HIV, hoping to help others to do the same.  Here are 5 of them.

In a 2011 interview with DRUM  magazine, Bala spoke openly about living with HIV. He said he had received the diagnosis in 2010 and had made a commitment to help others in the same situation. He however died of cancer in 2015.

“I am HIV-positive, and as a celebrity and someone who is openly gay, it is important to come out. I want to use my bubbly personality to help those struggling to come to terms with their status and instil a sense of hope.”

Radio DJ Criselda Kananda, was diagnosed HIV positive more than 13 years ago, when she was seven months pregnant. Today she is a mother of 3, motivational speaker, professional counsellor, former nurse, medical underwriter and serves on the board of the South African National AIDS Council.

Lesego Motsepe who for 10 years played Lettie Matabane in Isidingo, disclosed her status on World AIDS Day in 2011. She said “Our society had made this virus a monster and all it is, is a virus. I’m doing it for the voiceless people out there who just found out today, and know that I’ve got their back.” Sadly Motsepe stopped using life-saving ARVs in 2012. She died in 2014.

Gospel artist Musa ‘Queen’ Njoko publicly disclosed her HIV-positive status in 1995. She was 22 when she was diagnosed, at a time when treatment was not available in South Africa. She faced a lot of stigma and hostility but also found support.

Former footballer, Thabang Sefatsa made headlines  when he confessed to being HIV positive, and he revealed the reason why more players don’t speak out.