Finder dating app

finder dating app

For those who haven't heard of Tinder , let me introduce you. It's an app you can download at the click of an iPhone and play at the bus stop, one that uses your smartphone's GPS to track down other Tindering singles in your area. It's a game in which you quickly rate faces as hot or not, with a swipe of your finger to either the right or the left respectively. It's free, easy and convenient, and the prize you get at the end of it? A real-life date, with a real-life person.

Tinder uses the same GPS capabilities as Grindr – the wildly popular and barefacedly grimy gay hook-up app – but requires every user to have a Facebook account, which gives it a safer air. People are less likely to create multiple accounts, and users can't contact their potential beaux until both have said "yes" to one another on screen. This is another way in which the app improves upon the dating website experience, where women are often inundated with sexual commentary from unwanted suitors.

A quick scan of the local area gives me a seemingly endless list of men to choose from, all in the age range I've specified in the "preferences" section (admittedly, I live in central London, and the pickings would be slimmer if I were Tindering from the Yorkshire dales). I flick idly through a few pictures, subjecting them to either the heart icon or the big red X. I'm careful not to use it in the office: friends of mine have already come a cropper by discovering their colleagues on the screen and finding out more than they ever wanted to know – a picture of the IT coordinator's penis is never welcome. Tinder is quite strict about vetting that kind of image, but inevitably a few slip through.

Every so often, I'm informed that I've approved someone who has also approved me. "It's a match!" the screen announces, and a chat box appears, inviting me to start up a text conversation with a stranger who has declared me attractive enough to parley with. In the US, there are apparently more than 2m matches every day. It feels uncomfortably shallow at first but, as one of my fellow Tindering friends points out, "You'd just be doing it in your head at the pub anyway."

The fourth and fifth excursions are a little more charmed. Number four is an investment banker (alarm bells) but has great taste in music, and when he takes me to an unpretentious bar I never knew existed near my house and tells me about his childhood, I start to forgive him his job title. "I would never usually use anything like Tinder," he says, the same way that most men attempt to when you turn up to meet them. Curiously my female friends are much less inclined to be apologetic, and explain their presence on the dating app simply with the phrase: "It's normal now." Against all odds, the investment banker and I end up arranging a second date for next week.

Number five takes me to a subtitled movie at the Barbican, the Viagra of all hipster dates. We get lost on our way out and end up standing in the darkness, trapped by a maze of brutalist architecture and a large moat, laughing at our inability to navigate one of the most iconic structures in London. I'm just about to convince myself that I'm falling in love with him.

This true but unnecessary slight floors me, and on the walk home from the tube I block his chat box. It turns out that the dating world is just as cruel as it ever was, with just as much chance of toying with your emotions, whether you match the savvy, carefree Tinder demographic or not. But there's no doubting that the app takes some of the sting out of "putting yourself out there": you quickly forget about the reams of people you've approved and who haven't approved you back, thus sparing yourself all the emotional turmoil you might have encountered by approaching an uninterested person in the real world. Eventually, however, Tinder exhausts even the most hardened cynic's capacity for superficiality.

When something claims to be the new anything, it sends up a red flag. Once in a technological blue moon, however, something comes along that just might be better than the original. Remember when Facebook was the new MySpace?

Meet Hinge, the new dating app that's just launched in Sydney.  Like Tinder, it imports your data from Facebook and employs the familiar swipe right for yes, left for no functionality, but it has a few key updates on the format. ( Try Hinge for yourself here .)

That's pretty obvious from the get-go. While Tinder claims to have 350 million swipes per day, it's viewed by the general public as a game. It's why "We met on Tinder" relationship stories get such a reaction – no one really believed it would happen.

This is basically what it boils down to: Tinder is for hookups, Hinge is for dating. It makes perfect sense that the world of online dating becomes mobile-centric, because  everything  is going mobile.

The theory goes that Hinge's tags (full list below) are used to better match you to potential partners. The system falls down, however, when you realise that it's infallible. Suppose you swipe left on a number of people purely based on their photo, but by an unlucky coincidence they all happen to be animal lovers. What happens when Hinge starts thinking you simply hate animal lovers? How many awesome people with dogs you can walk together will you be missing out on?

Sure, meeting people online has lost the stigma that plagued it five years ago, and when Tinder launched in 2012 it shook the whole game up. Suddenly it was cool to have Tinder, instead of a shameful secret.

Hinge actually launched prior to Tinder in 2011 as a web-app . The mobile app was launched in 2013, and a year later raised $12 million in funding to take it to the next level. It's now launched in 38 cities across the globe. Sydney is their first foray into the Australian market, but you can bet it'll be making it's way to Melbourne and more in the near future.

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DateFinder - The Online Dating Website for Singles

When something claims to be the new anything, it sends up a red flag. Once in a technological blue moon, however, something comes along that just might be better than the original. Remember when Facebook was the new MySpace?

Meet Hinge, the new dating app that's just launched in Sydney.  Like Tinder, it imports your data from Facebook and employs the familiar swipe right for yes, left for no functionality, but it has a few key updates on the format. ( Try Hinge for yourself here .)

That's pretty obvious from the get-go. While Tinder claims to have 350 million swipes per day, it's viewed by the general public as a game. It's why "We met on Tinder" relationship stories get such a reaction – no one really believed it would happen.

This is basically what it boils down to: Tinder is for hookups, Hinge is for dating. It makes perfect sense that the world of online dating becomes mobile-centric, because  everything  is going mobile.

The theory goes that Hinge's tags (full list below) are used to better match you to potential partners. The system falls down, however, when you realise that it's infallible. Suppose you swipe left on a number of people purely based on their photo, but by an unlucky coincidence they all happen to be animal lovers. What happens when Hinge starts thinking you simply hate animal lovers? How many awesome people with dogs you can walk together will you be missing out on?

Sure, meeting people online has lost the stigma that plagued it five years ago, and when Tinder launched in 2012 it shook the whole game up. Suddenly it was cool to have Tinder, instead of a shameful secret.

Hinge actually launched prior to Tinder in 2011 as a web-app . The mobile app was launched in 2013, and a year later raised $12 million in funding to take it to the next level. It's now launched in 38 cities across the globe. Sydney is their first foray into the Australian market, but you can bet it'll be making it's way to Melbourne and more in the near future.