Aitken 1998 an introduction to optical dating divas

aitken 1998 an introduction to optical dating divas

September 1993
Aitken is spotted at the Paris Ritz hotel. Said Mohammed Ayas and Wafic Said, two former business associates, were also seen there at the same time. His bill is paid by Prince Mohammed bin Fahd of Saudi Arabia.

October 1993
The Guardian is tipped off by Mohamed Al-Fayed about Jonathan Aitken's recent stay at the Paris Ritz. When contacted by the paper, Aitken maintains his wife settled the bill.

November 1993
Guardian sends "cod fax" to Paris Ritz to secure a copy of Jonathan Aitken's bill for his stay in September 1993. The ploy is successful.

October 1994
John Major announces the setting up of the Nolan Committee on standards in public life. Story of the Guardian's "cod fax" is leaked by the Sunday Telegraph.

March 1995
Fresh allegations that Aitken knew about the arms deals with Iran in breach of the government embargo as he would have routinely seen BMARC company progress reports. Aitken denies knowledge of them.

April 1995
The Guardian reveals that Aitken's Paris Ritz hotel bill was paid by the Saudis. Screening of Granada's World in Action documentary, Jonathan of Arabia, about the business and personal dealings between Aitken and Mohammed bin Fahd. Among the programme's accusations, it is alleged that Aitken pimped for Saudi friends at a health farm.

10 April 1995
Jonathan Aitken announces he has issued writs against the Guardian and its editor-in-chief. Resigning from the Cabinet, he declares, "If it falls to me to start a fight to cut out the cancer of bent and twisted journalism in our country with the simple sword of truth and the trusty shield of fair play, so be it."

Clare Alexander said: "A towering figure in so many of our lives, publishing has lost a great agent from a brilliant generation. He was a wise counsel, a true intellectual and an irreplaceable friend."

She added: "I am sure he would wish to be remembered in the words of some of the many authors who valued his guidance deeply and who came to love him so much."

Novelist Sebastian Faulks said: "Gillon was one of my closest friends. He was also my literary agent for 30 years. He was a wonderful mixture of the grand and the modest: lofty, amusing, well-connected but warm in friendship and with little personal pride. The way he lived his last years after the loss of his beloved only child, Charlotte, was a lesson in stoicism and dignity that I shall never forget. As an agent, he was creative, mischievous and drove a hard bargain; but he was also realistic. For my wife and for me, there was no one like Gillon – and there never will be again."

Wild Swans author Jung Chang and her husband, the historian Jon Haliday, paid tribute: "Gillon was a man of great wisdom and great sensitivity.  He was supremely well-read, with an unusually broad culture, encompassing not least a rare knowledge of Russia, its mores and language; among his achievements was a distinguished translation of Pushkin. He was not only an ideal agent, but also a great gentleman, and terrific fun, with an ever-observant eye for the pretentious and the absurd. He took immense, and discriminating, care in everything he did.  To know how much he cared, and that we could always rely on his judgement, in all things, gave us both a much-treasured sense of tranquillity not just in our work, but in our lives. We have lost a great friend."

Bridget Jones creator Helen Fielding said: "Gillon Aitken was the quintessential British gentleman. His decency, dazzlingly dry wit, stoicism, wisdom, erudition, kindness, elegance and huge sense of fun represented the best of traditional British values. Gillon has been my guide and protector since I first walked into his office  with a few chapters of a first novel and, throughout the  Bridget Jones journey, my rock and moral touchstone. I will miss him terribly. He was a rare and irreplaceable treasure in the literary world."

Novelist Edward St Aubyn commented: "If I'd asked Gillon's advice about whether to write something flattering about him, he would have said, with a short laugh, 'I wouldn't bother if I were you.' He was against excessive marketing and excessive displays of emotion, but there is nothing excessive in saying that he was a brilliant agent and a steadfast friend who guided me from the very beginning of my career until a few weeks ago.

"As a friend he was a rare combination of deep reserve and deep sympathy, of great clarity and wit that far from showing off, he went to some trouble to disguise: an extraordinary person who I loved and already miss."

This report is one of a series of best evidence synthesis iterations (BESs) commissioned by the Ministry of Education. The Iterative Best Evidence Synthesis Programme seeks to support collaborative knowledge building and use across policy, research, and practice in education.

By connecting teaching and learning via these questions, the synthesis aims to inform understanding of a pedagogy for social sciences teaching that draws on the concept of ‘ako’.
Linda Tuhiwai Smith explains 2 :

Pedagogical approaches in the social sciences have been the subject of a number of national surveys in New Zealand 16 .

While a survey of 853 teachers in 2002 found that social studies teachers were generally very satisfied with the curriculum 17 , the Education Review Office (ERO) 18 expressed concern that:

This BES iteration aims to identify and explain pedagogical approaches that enable diverse students to achieve the desired outcomes of Te Whàriki, tikanga à iwi, social studies, and senior school subjects including history, geography, economics, classical studies, psychology, sociology, and legal studies. The evidence it synthesises is drawn from and relevant to early childhood, kòhanga reo, kura kaupapa Màori, primary and secondary settings, and both English- and Màori-medium contexts.

Given that the objective of this synthesis was greater understanding of the relationship between pedagogy and outcomes, the search for evidence focused on the intersection of disciplines, outcomes, and pedagogy (represented in Figure 2 by the region labelled X).

A further 92 studies were included because they shed light on particular contextual features (provided background on curriculum, outcomes, or methodology, or evidence by way of comment or argument), and another 62 because they provided evidence on student learning trajectories in the social sciences (see appendix C) 25 .

Given the scope of this search, a narrative report of strategies that ‘worked’ would have overwhelmed the reader. Worse, such an approach would have underestimated the role of context in the pedagogy–outcomes relationship; it would, therefore, have oversimplified the findings. For this reason, the synthesis follows two related approaches: identification of mechanisms, and cases.



Gillon Aitken dies | The Bookseller

Clare Alexander said: "A towering figure in so many of our lives, publishing has lost a great agent from a brilliant generation. He was a wise counsel, a true intellectual and an irreplaceable friend."

She added: "I am sure he would wish to be remembered in the words of some of the many authors who valued his guidance deeply and who came to love him so much."

Novelist Sebastian Faulks said: "Gillon was one of my closest friends. He was also my literary agent for 30 years. He was a wonderful mixture of the grand and the modest: lofty, amusing, well-connected but warm in friendship and with little personal pride. The way he lived his last years after the loss of his beloved only child, Charlotte, was a lesson in stoicism and dignity that I shall never forget. As an agent, he was creative, mischievous and drove a hard bargain; but he was also realistic. For my wife and for me, there was no one like Gillon – and there never will be again."

Wild Swans author Jung Chang and her husband, the historian Jon Haliday, paid tribute: "Gillon was a man of great wisdom and great sensitivity.  He was supremely well-read, with an unusually broad culture, encompassing not least a rare knowledge of Russia, its mores and language; among his achievements was a distinguished translation of Pushkin. He was not only an ideal agent, but also a great gentleman, and terrific fun, with an ever-observant eye for the pretentious and the absurd. He took immense, and discriminating, care in everything he did.  To know how much he cared, and that we could always rely on his judgement, in all things, gave us both a much-treasured sense of tranquillity not just in our work, but in our lives. We have lost a great friend."

Bridget Jones creator Helen Fielding said: "Gillon Aitken was the quintessential British gentleman. His decency, dazzlingly dry wit, stoicism, wisdom, erudition, kindness, elegance and huge sense of fun represented the best of traditional British values. Gillon has been my guide and protector since I first walked into his office  with a few chapters of a first novel and, throughout the  Bridget Jones journey, my rock and moral touchstone. I will miss him terribly. He was a rare and irreplaceable treasure in the literary world."

Novelist Edward St Aubyn commented: "If I'd asked Gillon's advice about whether to write something flattering about him, he would have said, with a short laugh, 'I wouldn't bother if I were you.' He was against excessive marketing and excessive displays of emotion, but there is nothing excessive in saying that he was a brilliant agent and a steadfast friend who guided me from the very beginning of my career until a few weeks ago.

"As a friend he was a rare combination of deep reserve and deep sympathy, of great clarity and wit that far from showing off, he went to some trouble to disguise: an extraordinary person who I loved and already miss."