Martin place siege review report dating

martin place siege review report dating

The Federal and New South Wales governments have ordered an urgent review of the Martin Place siege which will examine a range of issues including why the gunman was granted citizenship in Australia and what information security agencies had about him.

"We particularly need to know how someone with such a long record of violence, such a long record of mental instability, was out on bail after his involvement in a particularly horrific crime," he said.

"I certainly want answers to those sorts of questions and there was incredulity around the National Security Committee of the Cabinet yesterday when we were briefed on the details of his record and his life in this country."

The review has nine terms of reference, including the circumstances of Man Haron Monis' arrival in Australia, why he was granted citizenship, what welfare he received, how he was able to access a gun, what information security agencies had about him and how that information was shared.

Mr Abbott said Monis received social security benefits during much of his life in Australia even though he appeared to be able-bodied, "if not necessarily of sound mind".

"I share the exasperation of the Australian public at what appears to be someone who has been having a lend of us, at the very least, for so many years," he said.

He revealed Monis was being monitored by the domestic spy agency, ASIO, back in 2008 when he sent offensive letters to the families of dead Australian soldiers.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott has commissioned an urgent review into the Martin Place siege, questioning why the gunman was granted citizenship in Australia.

Mr Abbott had earlier questioned how Man Haron Monis had access to firearms and why he was granted a gun licence. But a spokesperson for NSW Police confirmed with the firearms registry that there was no record of his licence.

Mr Abbott said Australians should be confident in their police and security agencies, who acted professionally and with courage in responding to this "appalling outrage".

"We do need to know how someone with such a long record of violence and mental instability was out on bail after his involvement in a particularly horrific crime.

"In the aftermath of the horrific Martin Place siege and following the tragic loss of innocent lives, we must learn what we can from this incident and implement any changes necessary at the State and Federal level," he said.

"We are determined to ensure that nothing stands in the way of ensuring the people who put their lives on the line to keep Australia safe can get their job done."

Monis was no stranger to the law. He was given bail after being charged with two serious offences, the first being an accessory to the murder of his ex-wife late last year and then in April, more than 40 cases of sexual assault.

A SYDNEY court heard details of an alleged terror plot to be carried out in Martin Place in the wake of terror raids in Sydney and Melbourne in September this year.

The plot involved abducting a random Australian , executing them by beheading in a public place, possibly Martin Place in Sydney’s CBD, and filming the act and posting it on social media.

Martin Place has long been Sydney’s business hub, and a home to banks and finance companies. Closed to traffic, it runs from bustling George Street uphill to NSW Parliament House on Macquarie Street.

The Lindt cafe on the corner on Philip Street is directly opposite the Channel Seven studios, from which the network broadcasts its high-rating AM shows Sunrise and The Morning Show.

Channel 7’s Martin Place studio staff unwittingly became siege central, with The Morning Show ’s Larry Emdur and Kylie Gillies cutting from regular programming to broadcast the chilling vision live.

Seven News’ senior reporter Chris Reason was brought in to add commentary, while the rest of the Sydney news and current affairs staff were ordered to evacuate the building by NSW Police.

At 10.30am, the seriousness of the ISIS threat forced the remaining TV production staff to leave the premises, throwing to the network’s Melbourne news crew, anchored by Nick Etchells and Laurel Irving.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott has suggested that firearm laws may need to be changed as he said that the Martin Place gunman had a gun licence despite having a long criminal history that included being out on bail for being an accessory to murder.

The South Australian government has hit back, blaming the national energy market operator for the blackout that affected 90,000 Adelaide homes and businesses.

A man, who’s name has been withheld for legal reasons, has been charged with the murder of three children from Bowraville in the early 90’s, after being originally acquitted of the crime.

Australia's worst serial killers, David and Catherine Birnie may have killed more women than they were convicted for in 1986, suggests new series on Channel Seven, Murder Uncovered. Vision: Network Seven

Veteran Liberal Senator Ian Macdonald is pushing to keep the Life Gold Pass that gives former parliamentarians taxpayer-funded business class travel for life.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has taken his attack on Bill Shorten even further, with the Labor leader landing a few of his own blows. Courtesy ABC News 24.

As he announced an urgent review into the Martin Place siege that took the lives of two hostages, on Wednesday, Mr Abbott said that while he had great confidence in Australia's police and security agencies, there was a need to reflect on what could have been done better.



2014 Sydney hostage crisis - Wikipedia

Prime Minister Tony Abbott has commissioned an urgent review into the Martin Place siege, questioning why the gunman was granted citizenship in Australia.

Mr Abbott had earlier questioned how Man Haron Monis had access to firearms and why he was granted a gun licence. But a spokesperson for NSW Police confirmed with the firearms registry that there was no record of his licence.

Mr Abbott said Australians should be confident in their police and security agencies, who acted professionally and with courage in responding to this "appalling outrage".

"We do need to know how someone with such a long record of violence and mental instability was out on bail after his involvement in a particularly horrific crime.

"In the aftermath of the horrific Martin Place siege and following the tragic loss of innocent lives, we must learn what we can from this incident and implement any changes necessary at the State and Federal level," he said.

"We are determined to ensure that nothing stands in the way of ensuring the people who put their lives on the line to keep Australia safe can get their job done."

Monis was no stranger to the law. He was given bail after being charged with two serious offences, the first being an accessory to the murder of his ex-wife late last year and then in April, more than 40 cases of sexual assault.