The league dating app android

the league dating app android

The League, which launched in January and has raised $2.1 million, is for people who are “too popular as it is,” according to its site. Thirty percent of the app’s users have advanced degrees, and 18% are executives, vice presidents or founders, according to The League’s founder and CEO Amanda Bradford.

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The League, a dating app intended to attract “high quality” singles, is launching in San Francisco Wednesday, according to founder Amanda Bradford. Bradford created The League, which operates like Tinder by pairing up individuals who have “liked” one another, in hopes of matching singles who are more “ambitious” and “engaged” than users of other dating apps like Tinder .

Bradford, who graduated from Stanford’s MBA program, helped select the app’s first 1,000 members by leaning heavily on her grad school connections and recommendations from friends in the area, she says. In doing so, she wanted to create a community of people serious about both their careers and finding a date, a “nightclub” of sorts for the online dating world.

Bradford was frustrated after trying other dating apps. She found that men often “swiped right” (that is, they expressed interest) on basically every woman on services like Tinder. This leads to a high quantity of matches, but makes it harder to create meaningful ones, she explains.

With The League, users can be booted off the service if they’re matched up and routinely fail to send a message, she says. The League even keeps a “flakiness score” for users to determine whether or not they are engaging with others in the community.

She also ran into people she was connected with on Facebook and LinkedIn on other apps, mixing her personal and professional lives. On The League, you can eliminate those connections as possible matches.

While it sounds elitist, Bradford says her exclusive strategy has paid off — at least in terms of generating early interest in the app. The waiting list for The League is more than 10,000 people across the country, 3,000 in San Francisco alone. She says her ultimate goal is not to operate a super-exclusive app, but that she wants to start the community out on the right foot.

The approach has even attracted some interest from investors. Bradford said she took $75,000 in seed funding from IDG Ventures, xSeed Capital, and Cowboy Ventures, and is in the process of raising another small “angel round.”

Say goodbye to Tinder with a dating app so elite, there's a screening process and a waitlist of over 100,000 people chomping at the bit to connect with their perfect partner. The app is called The League , and it's caused a bit of commotion online from both supporters and naysayers.

The app's founder and Stanford University graduate, Amanda Bradford, created the app as a sort of "Tinder for elites", which means not just anyone who's single can join – there's an intensive screening process, or 'advanced screening algorithm' (which the app refuses to disclose) that users have to go through in order to be considered at all.

Even though the private beta was only recently available in San Francisco and New York, The League has started its expansion to other cities, including Los Angeles, with plans to eventually move across North America.

Once your profile is accepted, The League makes your dating experience as easy as pie. The app promises no voyeurs, no games, no noise, no fake profiles, the ability to hide your profile from friends and coworkers, and more. But while the appeal of stress-free dating is unbelievably attractive, some people are heated knowing they probably won't be allowed to make a profile.

In January, a senior student from Stanford University spotted an internship opportunity from The League and took the opportunity to voice her opinion on the app online:

I just wanted to say, as a Stanford senior, I am totally and utterly ashamed that this dating service came out of Stanford… is it possible to get more elitist than this? … Do you realize there are millions of people out there who are kinder, nicer, harder working, more devoted, passionate, and interesting people than those who you believe are 'qualified' for your service, but that simply do not have the same opportunities as you, and I, have had?

Is it possible that Stanford admissions standards have gone down? … Anyone can apply and join the League regardless of their income, the family they're from, their profession, or what schools they've attended.



The League - Meet. Intelligently. on the App Store

The League, a dating app intended to attract “high quality” singles, is launching in San Francisco Wednesday, according to founder Amanda Bradford. Bradford created The League, which operates like Tinder by pairing up individuals who have “liked” one another, in hopes of matching singles who are more “ambitious” and “engaged” than users of other dating apps like Tinder .

Bradford, who graduated from Stanford’s MBA program, helped select the app’s first 1,000 members by leaning heavily on her grad school connections and recommendations from friends in the area, she says. In doing so, she wanted to create a community of people serious about both their careers and finding a date, a “nightclub” of sorts for the online dating world.

Bradford was frustrated after trying other dating apps. She found that men often “swiped right” (that is, they expressed interest) on basically every woman on services like Tinder. This leads to a high quantity of matches, but makes it harder to create meaningful ones, she explains.

With The League, users can be booted off the service if they’re matched up and routinely fail to send a message, she says. The League even keeps a “flakiness score” for users to determine whether or not they are engaging with others in the community.

She also ran into people she was connected with on Facebook and LinkedIn on other apps, mixing her personal and professional lives. On The League, you can eliminate those connections as possible matches.

While it sounds elitist, Bradford says her exclusive strategy has paid off — at least in terms of generating early interest in the app. The waiting list for The League is more than 10,000 people across the country, 3,000 in San Francisco alone. She says her ultimate goal is not to operate a super-exclusive app, but that she wants to start the community out on the right foot.

The approach has even attracted some interest from investors. Bradford said she took $75,000 in seed funding from IDG Ventures, xSeed Capital, and Cowboy Ventures, and is in the process of raising another small “angel round.”