Is crohn disease fatal yahoo dating

is crohn disease fatal yahoo dating

Management of Crohn's disease involves first treating the acute symptoms of the disease, then maintaining remission . Since Crohn's disease is an immune system condition , it cannot be cured by medication or surgery. Treatment initially involves the use of medications to eliminate infections (generally antibiotics ) and reduce inflammation (generally aminosalicylate anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids ). Surgery may be required for complications such as obstructions or abscesses , or if the disease does not respond to drugs within a reasonable time. However, surgery cannot cure Crohn's disease. It involves removing the diseased part of the intestine and rejoining the healthy ends, but the disease tends to recur after surgery.

Once remission is induced, the goal of treatment becomes maintenance of remission: avoiding the return of active disease, or "flares". Because of side effects, the prolonged use of corticosteroids is avoided. Although some people are able to maintain remission spontaneously, many require immunosuppressive drugs . [1]

5-ASA compounds, such as mesalazine and sulfasalazine , have shown to be of very little efficacy in the treatment of Crohn's disease, either for induction or for maintenance of remission. [2] Current guidelines do not advise the use of 5-ASA compounds in Crohn's disease.

Corticosteroids are a class of anti-inflammatory drugs used to treat moderate to severe flares of Crohn's disease. However, they are used sparingly because they can cause serious side effects, [3] including Cushing's syndrome , mania , insomnia , hypertension , high blood glucose , osteoporosis , and avascular necrosis of long bones . Corticosteroids should not be confused with the anabolic steroids used to enhance athletic performance.

The most commonly prescribed oral steroid is prednisone , which is typically dosed at 0.5 mg/kg for induction of remission in Crohn's disease. [4] Intravenous steroids, administered in a hospital setting, are used when oral steroids do not work or cannot be taken. [3] Because corticosteroids reduce the body's ability to fight infection, care must be taken to ensure that there is no active infection, particularly an intra-abdominal abscess , before the initiation of steroids.

Another oral corticosteroid, budesonide (trade name Entocort), has limited absorption and a high level of first-pass metabolism , meaning that lower quantities of the drug enter the bloodstream. It has been shown to be useful in the treatment of mild to moderate Crohn's disease, [5] and in maintaining remission. [6] It is also effective when used in combination with antibiotics to treat active Crohn's disease. [7] Budesonide is released in the ileum and right colon , and therefore has a topical effect against disease in that area. [5]

Steroid enemas can also be used to treat symptoms in the lower colon and rectum . Hydrocortisone and budesonide liquid and foam enemas are marketed for this purpose.

Crohn’s disease (CD), also known as granulomatous colitis or regional enteritis, is a chronic, nonspecific inflammatory disease of the bowel that occurs most commonly in the terminal ileum, jejunum, and the colon, although it may affect any part of the gastrointestinal (GI) system from the mouth to the anus. In the United States, the prevalence of CD is approximately 201 cases per 100,000 adults and 43 cases per 100,000 children, and the prevalence has steadily increased in recent decades. Like ulcerative colitis, CD is marked by remissions and exacerbations, but, unlike ulcerative colitis, it can affect any portion of the tubular GI tract.

The disease creates deep, longitudinal mucosal ulcerations and nodular submucosal thickenings called granulomas, which give the intestinal wall a cobblestone appearance and may alter its absorptive abilities. The inflamed and ulcerated areas occur only in segments of the bowel, and normal bowel tissue segments occur between the diseased segments. Eventually, thickening of the bowel wall, narrowing of the bowel lumen, and strictures of the bowel are common. Also, fistulae that connect to other tissue—such as the skin, bladder, rectum, and vagina—often occur.

Research has not established a specific cause for CD. Infectious agents such as a virus or bacterium, an autoimmune reaction, environmental factors such as geographic location, individual factors such as smoking and dietary exposure, and genetic factors are all being investigated. Researchers now believe that emotional stress and psychological changes are a result of the chronic and severe symptoms of CD rather than a cause. Some experts suggest that patients have an inherited susceptibility for an abnormal immunological response to one or more of the factors listed here.

There is no clear agreement on how genetic and environmental factors lead to the tissue damage in inflammatory bowel disease. A sibling of an affected person has a 30% higher risk of developing the disease than someone from the general population. Mutations in the gene encoding Nod2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein 2) may result in CD by altering intestinal production of antimicrobial proteins. In addition, recent evidence indicates that the GLI1 gene, which has not been previously associated with immune modulation, appears to be important for an appropriate inflammatory response in both humans and mice. Studies are ongoing.

CD may occur at any age in both men and women, with rates slightly higher in males; it is generally first diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 30. Reports indicate that the number being diagnosed at age 55 and older is growing; thus, the age distribution is bimodal (15 to 30 and 55 to 70). Two factors that may predispose the elderly to CD include an increased vulnerability to infection and a susceptibility to inadequate blood supply to the bowel because of the aging process. CD is more common in whites than in African Americans or Asian Americans, and there is a two- to four-fold increase in the prevalence of CD in the Jewish population in the United States and Europe as compared with other groups.

Western developed countries seem to have a similar prevalence of CD. In Western Europe and North America, the more temperate the climate and the more urban the environment, the higher the rates of CD. Rates are lower in Asia and the Middle East as compared to North America and Western Europe.

Patients initially report insidious symptoms such as mild, non-bloody diarrhea (three to five semisoft stools per day); fatigue; anorexia; and vague, intermittent abdominal pain. As the disease progresses, they complain of more severe, constant abdominal pain that typically localizes in the right lower quadrant, weight loss, more severe fatigue, and moderate fever. Some patients may also report skin breakdown in the perineal and rectal areas.

Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) characterized by inflammation Immune response to tissue injury that causes redness, swelling, and pain. of the digestive, or gastrointestinal (GI) tract Collectively referring to the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines, and anus. . In fact, Crohn’s can affect any part of the GI tract, from the mouth to the anus, but it is more commonly found at the end of the small intestine Long, tube-like organ in the abdomen that completes the process of digestion. It consists of the small and large intestines. Also called the bowel. (the ileum) where it joins the beginning of the large intestine (or colon). It can also affect:

It’s important not to confuse an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) like Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a disorder that affects the muscle contractions of the bowel and is not characterized by intestinal inflammation , nor is it a chronic disease.

Although the exact causes are unknown, researchers believe Crohn’s disease is caused by a combination of factors involving genetics, the environment, and an overactive immune system. It is not caused by something you ate.

If you have symptoms that could indicate Crohn’s, you will likely undergo a few different tests and procedures to get a diagnosis, as there is no one test that can definitively diagnose Crohn’s disease.

Crohn’s is a chronic Continuing or occurring again and again for a long time. , life-long disease that requires constant treatment. Even though there is no cure for Crohn’s, there are many different medications available to treat it. There are times when surgery may also be necessary for some patients.

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CCFA: What is Crohn s Disease | Causes of Crohn s

Crohn’s disease (CD), also known as granulomatous colitis or regional enteritis, is a chronic, nonspecific inflammatory disease of the bowel that occurs most commonly in the terminal ileum, jejunum, and the colon, although it may affect any part of the gastrointestinal (GI) system from the mouth to the anus. In the United States, the prevalence of CD is approximately 201 cases per 100,000 adults and 43 cases per 100,000 children, and the prevalence has steadily increased in recent decades. Like ulcerative colitis, CD is marked by remissions and exacerbations, but, unlike ulcerative colitis, it can affect any portion of the tubular GI tract.

The disease creates deep, longitudinal mucosal ulcerations and nodular submucosal thickenings called granulomas, which give the intestinal wall a cobblestone appearance and may alter its absorptive abilities. The inflamed and ulcerated areas occur only in segments of the bowel, and normal bowel tissue segments occur between the diseased segments. Eventually, thickening of the bowel wall, narrowing of the bowel lumen, and strictures of the bowel are common. Also, fistulae that connect to other tissue—such as the skin, bladder, rectum, and vagina—often occur.

Research has not established a specific cause for CD. Infectious agents such as a virus or bacterium, an autoimmune reaction, environmental factors such as geographic location, individual factors such as smoking and dietary exposure, and genetic factors are all being investigated. Researchers now believe that emotional stress and psychological changes are a result of the chronic and severe symptoms of CD rather than a cause. Some experts suggest that patients have an inherited susceptibility for an abnormal immunological response to one or more of the factors listed here.

There is no clear agreement on how genetic and environmental factors lead to the tissue damage in inflammatory bowel disease. A sibling of an affected person has a 30% higher risk of developing the disease than someone from the general population. Mutations in the gene encoding Nod2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein 2) may result in CD by altering intestinal production of antimicrobial proteins. In addition, recent evidence indicates that the GLI1 gene, which has not been previously associated with immune modulation, appears to be important for an appropriate inflammatory response in both humans and mice. Studies are ongoing.

CD may occur at any age in both men and women, with rates slightly higher in males; it is generally first diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 30. Reports indicate that the number being diagnosed at age 55 and older is growing; thus, the age distribution is bimodal (15 to 30 and 55 to 70). Two factors that may predispose the elderly to CD include an increased vulnerability to infection and a susceptibility to inadequate blood supply to the bowel because of the aging process. CD is more common in whites than in African Americans or Asian Americans, and there is a two- to four-fold increase in the prevalence of CD in the Jewish population in the United States and Europe as compared with other groups.

Western developed countries seem to have a similar prevalence of CD. In Western Europe and North America, the more temperate the climate and the more urban the environment, the higher the rates of CD. Rates are lower in Asia and the Middle East as compared to North America and Western Europe.

Patients initially report insidious symptoms such as mild, non-bloody diarrhea (three to five semisoft stools per day); fatigue; anorexia; and vague, intermittent abdominal pain. As the disease progresses, they complain of more severe, constant abdominal pain that typically localizes in the right lower quadrant, weight loss, more severe fatigue, and moderate fever. Some patients may also report skin breakdown in the perineal and rectal areas.