Royal enfield standard 500 price in bangalore dating

royal enfield standard 500 price in bangalore dating

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Thunderbird is one of the oldest bike series sold by Royal Enfield; it has been around for more than 15 years.  RE uses the same 346cc unit construction engine which powers all the 350cc bikes in its portfolio. Cosmetically, the bike has undergone a visible change as it gets a teardrop fuel tank, digital instrument cluster, LED tail light etc.  Power on offer by the 4 stroke, Twinspark single cylinder engine is decent enough. 

Treatment given to the bike is in typical RE fashion, there is no unnecessary styling unlike the new entrants that don an intricate framework. Features that bring prominence to the design are the large fuel tank, upright seating position and wide seat. Chrome is used amply, although it doesn’t look overboard. In fact RE has used chrome smartly on the body skewing focus on the easily visible parts. The traditional multi-spoke wheels are fixed in front and rear, this is something that is associated with the classic RE design. The seat design is a put off, but where RE manages to score is the fit, finish and quality. 

Power is generated by a 350cc, air-cooled, single cylinder engine yielding 19.80bhp at 5,250 RPM. There is enough torque for this bulky motorcycle which develops 28 Nm at 4000 RPM. Weighing 192 kg, Thunderbird 350 has a relatively low power to weight ratio which affects the performance. 

Glaring the rider in the eye is the twin-pod instrument cluster that features an analog speedometer, odometer, tripmeter and it also shows low average economy. Other features aboard are fuel warning indicator, fuel gauge, low oil indicator, low battery indicator, engine kill switch and a grabrail for the pillion. Up front a projection type head light is fitted and rear is ornate with LED tail lamp. 

Performance isn’t as fascinating as one would expect from a bike belonging to RE clan. Unfortunately, the 350cc engine lacks punch and the hefty weight plays against it restricting bike’s ride quality. Thunderbird 350 shows signs of discomfort when cruised above 90 kmph. As per Royal Enfield’s word, Thunderbird 350 can deliver 23 kmpl of fuel economy which is way too less as compared to competitors in the segment. 

Power is retarded by 280mm disc brakes in front and 240mm disc brakes at rear. The bike gets a telescopic, 41 mm forks, 110mm travel suspension in front and twin gas charged shock absorbers with 5-step adjustable preload, 80mm travel suspension at rear. The uncomfortable seat adds to the woes of the rider and suspension set up isn’t retentive which results in poor ride quality. Handling is also not impressive as the bike feels lethargic while on the go. 

Royal Enfield motorcycles were being sold in India ever since 1949. In 1955, the Indian government started looking for a suitable motorcycle for its police forces and the army for patrolling duties on the country's border. The Bullet 350 was chosen as the most suitable bike for the job. The Indian government ordered 800 of these 350 cc motorcycles, an enormous order for that time. Thus In 1955, the Redditch Company partnered with Madras Motors in India to form what was called 'Enfield India' to assemble these 350 cc Bullet motorcycle under licence in erstwhile madras (Now called Chennai).

In 1990, Enfield India entered into a strategic alliance with the Eicher Group, and later merged with it in 1994. It was during this merger that the name Enfield India changed to Royal Enfield.



Royal Enfield Bullet - Wikipedia

Thunderbird is one of the oldest bike series sold by Royal Enfield; it has been around for more than 15 years.  RE uses the same 346cc unit construction engine which powers all the 350cc bikes in its portfolio. Cosmetically, the bike has undergone a visible change as it gets a teardrop fuel tank, digital instrument cluster, LED tail light etc.  Power on offer by the 4 stroke, Twinspark single cylinder engine is decent enough. 

Treatment given to the bike is in typical RE fashion, there is no unnecessary styling unlike the new entrants that don an intricate framework. Features that bring prominence to the design are the large fuel tank, upright seating position and wide seat. Chrome is used amply, although it doesn’t look overboard. In fact RE has used chrome smartly on the body skewing focus on the easily visible parts. The traditional multi-spoke wheels are fixed in front and rear, this is something that is associated with the classic RE design. The seat design is a put off, but where RE manages to score is the fit, finish and quality. 

Power is generated by a 350cc, air-cooled, single cylinder engine yielding 19.80bhp at 5,250 RPM. There is enough torque for this bulky motorcycle which develops 28 Nm at 4000 RPM. Weighing 192 kg, Thunderbird 350 has a relatively low power to weight ratio which affects the performance. 

Glaring the rider in the eye is the twin-pod instrument cluster that features an analog speedometer, odometer, tripmeter and it also shows low average economy. Other features aboard are fuel warning indicator, fuel gauge, low oil indicator, low battery indicator, engine kill switch and a grabrail for the pillion. Up front a projection type head light is fitted and rear is ornate with LED tail lamp. 

Performance isn’t as fascinating as one would expect from a bike belonging to RE clan. Unfortunately, the 350cc engine lacks punch and the hefty weight plays against it restricting bike’s ride quality. Thunderbird 350 shows signs of discomfort when cruised above 90 kmph. As per Royal Enfield’s word, Thunderbird 350 can deliver 23 kmpl of fuel economy which is way too less as compared to competitors in the segment. 

Power is retarded by 280mm disc brakes in front and 240mm disc brakes at rear. The bike gets a telescopic, 41 mm forks, 110mm travel suspension in front and twin gas charged shock absorbers with 5-step adjustable preload, 80mm travel suspension at rear. The uncomfortable seat adds to the woes of the rider and suspension set up isn’t retentive which results in poor ride quality. Handling is also not impressive as the bike feels lethargic while on the go.