34 years ang dating daan

34 years ang dating daan

I’m tired of reading stories from old farts about the so-called “people power” revolution that transpired at EDSA in 1986. These old-timers hold a tradition to relive the tale over and over and this year is no different as Filipinos set out to mark the 30th anniversary of the event. The stories seem to be growing on trees lately and some of them are annoying because they omit the important role played by Senator Juan Ponce Enrile & former President Fidel Ramos in the lead up to the event. Cory Aquino wasn’t even present during the three-day rally as she was said to be hiding in Cebu but her supporters keep crediting EDSA’s “success” to her.

A 3-day fiesta: The so-called EDSA ‘people power’ revolution Had Enrile and Ramos not defected from the Marcos administration, the military then would have probably dispersed the crowd even before their numbers reached a hundred. Fortunately for those who took to the streets to support Enrile and Ramos, the military did not touch them. It’s no secret that the military respected both Enrile and Ramos in those days and possibly until now. The people should also give credit to the late former President Ferdinand Marcos for not insisting on shooting or using water canons on the protesters. A truly evil dictator like the late Muammar Gaddafi and Bashar al-Assad would have clung to power even if it meant killing hundreds of civilians.

Those who keep reliving the stories of EDSA simply can’t move on. They cling on to the memory of the event partly because of the fiesta atmosphere and mostly because the event was anti-climactic. What followed the “success” of the EDSA revolution was disappointing.

Truly, after all the build up, the ending of the EDSA story was an anticlimactic letdown. I feel sorry for people who are stuck in the past. Being stuck in the past is a phenomenon that occurs when nothing significant has happened in the succeeding years following a supposedly seminal event or when things went downhill from a happy and glorious event.

While the peaceful revolution was hailed worldwide and impressed the international community, three decades later, not much has changed in Philippine society. Filipinos are facing a different kind of tyranny nowadays – something that is even more difficult to remove than a single dictator – the members of the oligarchy. They are the few powerful elite families and clans that own and control mainstream media, telecommunications networks, power and water supply. They provide mostly crappy service and shortchange their Filipino customers.

The protesters may have succeeded in ousting Marcos Sr, but his successors, starting with the late President Cory Aquino, were either too incompetent or too corrupt in their own right to fix the ills of the nation. A lot of people actually describe the current President Benigno Simeon Aquino as both incompetent and corrupt and, in that sense, worse than Marcos Sr.

Sure, the Philippines or, rather, Metro Manila has more malls now than before and there are more cars on the road but those are hardly signs of progress. It’s actually an indication of society’s lack of imagination and lack of planning. The number of malls is proportionate to the number of people who spend a lot of time doing shallow activities like shopping and spending money instead of saving or investing it. The number of cars on the road point to the lack of reliable public transportation. We all know that Filipinos love their malls. But don’t ask BS Aquino why the traffic is bad. He’ll insist it is a sign of progress. He has this bizarre way of spinning his failures to suit a perception favorable to him.

On the first day of 2014, I took a solo motorcycle ride as a “good luck ride” for the year ahead. I ended up finding a very nice waterfall not that far from the city. This relatively unknown waterfall that’s just an hour away from the Quezon City area is a promising weekend destination for motorcyclists and mountain bikers.

The waterfall can be found within the Palo Alto Leisure and Residential Estates in Brgy. Pinugay, Baras, Rizal. This 200 hectare prime residential and commercial estate is being developed by the Sta. Lucia Land Inc. They’re currently selling estate lots here, for those who want to invest in their retirement farms or country estate mansions not that far from the metro. But in the meantime, some of the attractions, including the falls and a clubhouse are open to the public.

It’s hard to miss since there’s actually a billboard advertising an adventure park right by the side of the road with a picture of a waterfall on it. I ignored this during previous rides, since I assumed the photo was of Daranak or Batlag Falls –two popular waterfalls in Rizal, which I’ve previously been to. There are no entrance fees if you just want to inquire or take a look at the facilities. Just leave an ID with the guard at the main gate, and follow the paved road to your preferred destination (falls or clubhouse).

The place is ideal for motorcyclists and road trippers who want to go swimming and have picnics during the weekends. By car or motorcycle, the drive takes about an hour or less from QC without traffic. For mountain bikers, it’s more of a challenge, with the uphill ascents, but at least they can relax and cool down after a tiring ride. The whole complex has very good paved roads and secure parking areas for all types of vehicles.

From the parking area, you have to climb up 249 concrete steps to get to the foot of Palo Alto Falls, which is 1000 feet up. It sounds daunting at first, but really, it takes just about 5-8 minutes to get to the foot of the falls. Along the way, you’ll pass through thick forests beside a small stream, with water trickling down through the rocks. It’s very serene and peaceful, especially if you’re the only one there.

Soon enough, you’ll reach a set of native cottages surrounding the foot of the falls. The falls is still surrounded by lush trees and foliage and cascades down from about 60 feet high into a clear pool that has been cemented all around. The water here is very clean and clear, the grounds are well-maintained, and the place is really refreshing. What I like the most is its seclusion, unlike some other more popular waterfalls, which can get quite crowded. During my first visit, I was the only one there, so I had the falls all to myself. During my second visit to take photos, there were a few people swimming, but it didn’t feel crowded.

The other alternative (especially if you’re traveling with kids) is the leisure park’s clubhouse, which has a large resort-type swimming pool with winding water slides. The place looks very classy with landscaped gardens, relaxing lounge chairs, and a small bridge over the pool. There’s a large shower area with lockers and dressing rooms.



Senate approves bill requiring professionals to undergo.

On the first day of 2014, I took a solo motorcycle ride as a “good luck ride” for the year ahead. I ended up finding a very nice waterfall not that far from the city. This relatively unknown waterfall that’s just an hour away from the Quezon City area is a promising weekend destination for motorcyclists and mountain bikers.

The waterfall can be found within the Palo Alto Leisure and Residential Estates in Brgy. Pinugay, Baras, Rizal. This 200 hectare prime residential and commercial estate is being developed by the Sta. Lucia Land Inc. They’re currently selling estate lots here, for those who want to invest in their retirement farms or country estate mansions not that far from the metro. But in the meantime, some of the attractions, including the falls and a clubhouse are open to the public.

It’s hard to miss since there’s actually a billboard advertising an adventure park right by the side of the road with a picture of a waterfall on it. I ignored this during previous rides, since I assumed the photo was of Daranak or Batlag Falls –two popular waterfalls in Rizal, which I’ve previously been to. There are no entrance fees if you just want to inquire or take a look at the facilities. Just leave an ID with the guard at the main gate, and follow the paved road to your preferred destination (falls or clubhouse).

The place is ideal for motorcyclists and road trippers who want to go swimming and have picnics during the weekends. By car or motorcycle, the drive takes about an hour or less from QC without traffic. For mountain bikers, it’s more of a challenge, with the uphill ascents, but at least they can relax and cool down after a tiring ride. The whole complex has very good paved roads and secure parking areas for all types of vehicles.

From the parking area, you have to climb up 249 concrete steps to get to the foot of Palo Alto Falls, which is 1000 feet up. It sounds daunting at first, but really, it takes just about 5-8 minutes to get to the foot of the falls. Along the way, you’ll pass through thick forests beside a small stream, with water trickling down through the rocks. It’s very serene and peaceful, especially if you’re the only one there.

Soon enough, you’ll reach a set of native cottages surrounding the foot of the falls. The falls is still surrounded by lush trees and foliage and cascades down from about 60 feet high into a clear pool that has been cemented all around. The water here is very clean and clear, the grounds are well-maintained, and the place is really refreshing. What I like the most is its seclusion, unlike some other more popular waterfalls, which can get quite crowded. During my first visit, I was the only one there, so I had the falls all to myself. During my second visit to take photos, there were a few people swimming, but it didn’t feel crowded.

The other alternative (especially if you’re traveling with kids) is the leisure park’s clubhouse, which has a large resort-type swimming pool with winding water slides. The place looks very classy with landscaped gardens, relaxing lounge chairs, and a small bridge over the pool. There’s a large shower area with lockers and dressing rooms.