Del potro dating

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Andy Murray lost the longest match of his career to Juan Martin del Potro to leave Great Britain up against it in their bid to reach a second consecutive Davis Cup final.

After the drama of their Olympic singles final last month, which Murray won, there were sky-high expectations for this clash at Glasgow's Emirates Arena.

And it did not disappoint, with Del Potro finally prevailing 6-4 5-7 6-7 (5/7) 6-3 6-4 after five hours and seven minutes to give Argentina a 1-0 lead in the semi-final.

Murray, who was forced to miss his grandfather's funeral to play in the match, lost his proud record of never having been beaten in a home Davis Cup singles rubber.

Out of the game for nearly two years and forced to undergo three wrist operations, the Argentinian was close to retiring, but instead has made himself a force once again.

It was a measure of the 27-year-old's popularity around the world that even in the partisan world of Davis Cup he was welcomed on to the court with a big cheer.

The players’ sheer desire has surely squashed any doubts over tennis’s rightful place at these Games, and Andy Murray hasn’t just hit the ball better than anyone else over the past week - he has also showed the intensity of his passion.

Murray outlasted Juan Martin del Potro in a 4hr 2min dogfight; a match so physical that it could have been staged alongside the judo and the taekwondo in the Carioca Arena. Admittedly, he probably had fewer miles in his legs coming in, having made short work of Kei Nishikori on Saturday while Del Potro contested another epic against Rafael Nadal. But then Murray had played three doubles matches as well. He needed every ounce of his innate stubbornness to come through by a 7-5, 4-6, 6-2, 7-5 margin.

I t was a scrappy match but an utterly compelling one. At times you wondered who would stagger over the line first, because Murray never quite had his full kitbag of shots working cleanly. In the first set, his serve was as notable an absentee as Pele at the torch-lighting ceremony. Even when he managed to locate it, for periods of the second set, he promptly lost power in his legs instead. Closing out a title had never seemed so agonising.

“Tonight's one of the hardest matches I've had to play for a big title,” said Murray afterwards. “The US Open final when I played Novak and won my first slam was very hard, but tonight I found it really difficult. Emotionally it was tough, physically it was hard. There were so many ups and downs in the match.”

If Max Whitlock could win two gold medals in a couple of hours at the gymnastics, Murray somehow felt short-changed with only one. Not even the marathon runners have to work hours like this.

T he match was only around 30 minutes old when Del Potro started puffing hard, and going on little walkabouts between points. But each time he bolted down an energy gel at a changeover, he found another burst of inspiration. Meanwhile, the match was turning into a battle of brains as well as stamina as Murray tried to avoid Del Potro’s earth-shaking forehand – which stands unrivalled as the most powerful groundstroke in the game – and locate his less lethal backhand instead.

At one stage in the fourth set we entered a parallel universe where Del Potro was dinking the ball back with backspin off both wings as Murray moved him around with chess-like slices of his own. It was another example of Murray’s MacGyver-like ability to find solutions on the hoof, which has dug him out of so many awkward spots in the past.

T his was the most disappointing day for the British Davis Cup team since 2010, the year Leon Smith took on the captaincy. Having delivered a string of results at the recent US Open, Andy Murray and company were strongly favoured to beat Argentina in this semi-final.

Instead, the defending champions lost both matches and now need to win Saturday afternoon’s doubles rubber simply to keep interest alive until Sunday. Comebacks from 2-0 can happen – Great Britain overcame Russia from a similarly unpromising position in in 2013 – but that was the only time they have pulled off such an escape since the era of Fred Perry. The chances of climbing out of this weekend’s hole are remote.

T he X-factor was a singles defeat for Murray – the first he had ever suffered on home soil in this competition. Since beating Israel’s Andy Ram in 2006, he had won 20 straight singles matches in home ties, taking scalps of the quality of Kei Nishikori and Marin Cilic along the way. But yesterday he ran into a rejuvenated Juan Martín del Potro. Their struggle was intense and drawn-out, taking Murray past the five-hour mark for the first time in his career. In the end, it was Del Potro who claimed the decisive break with a near-impossible play, threading a running forehand pass at full tilt.

M urray was at his most irritable in the interview room after his 6-4, 5-7, 6-7, 6-3, 6-4 defeat, which occupied fully 5hr 7min. His mood was understandable, both because of the rarity of Davis Cup defeat (the only men to have previously got the better of him in this competition were Stan Wawrinka and Fabio Fognini), and because of the mental and physical baggage he brought into the weekend.

Murray looked washed out and demotivated as he returned to the court late in Edmund’s 6-7, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2 defeat at the hands of Pella, sitting with his legs up and leaving the cheerleading to Dan Evans. He had arrived in Glasgow feeling the after-effects of the most successful summer of his career, including a personal-best 22-match winning streak that lasted until the Cincinnati final. And his leg-weariness was complemented by the emotional toll of losing his grandfather, Gordon. He missed yesterday’s funeral to take the court.

“I’m very proud of how I played today,” he said. “I thought I did fantastic. I fought for every point, tried as best as I could. That’s all you can do.” But he didn’t sound entirely convinced by his own arguments.

H e knows that he still carries the burden for this team, and that Great Britain’s chances of defending last year’s Davis Cup triumph had just taken a major hit.

Officially operating as the Leavenworth and Pike's Peak Express Company of 1859, in 1860 it became the Central Overland California and Pikes Peak Express Company ; this firm was founded by William H. Russell , Alexander Majors , and William B. Waddell , all of whom were notable in the freighting business. [1]

During its 19 months of operation, it reduced the time for messages to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific coasts to about 10 days. [2] From April 3, 1860 to October 1861, it became the West's most direct means of east–west communication before the telegraph was established and was vital for tying the new state of California with the rest of the United States .

The idea of a fast mail route to the Pacific coast was prompted largely by California's newfound prominence and its rapidly growing population. After gold was discovered there in 1848 , thousands of prospectors , investors and businessmen made their way to California, at that time a new territory of the U.S. By 1850, California entered the Union as a free state. By 1860, the population had grown to 380,000. [3] The demand for a faster way to get mail and other communications to and from this westernmost state became even greater as the American Civil War approached.

In the late 1850s, William Russell, Alexander Majors, and William Waddell were the three founders of the Pony Express. They were already in the freighting and drayage business. At the peak of the operations, they employed 6,000 men, owned 75,000 oxen, thousands of wagons and warehouses plus a sawmill, a meatpacking plant, a bank and an insurance company. [4]

Russell was a prominent businessman, well respected among his peers and the community. [ citation needed ] Waddell was co-owner of the firm Morehead, Waddell & Co. After Morehead was bought out and retired, Waddell merged his company with Russell's, changing the name to Waddell & Russell. In 1855 they took on a new partner, Alexander Majors, and founded the company of Russell, Majors & Waddell. [5] They held government contracts for delivering army supplies to the western frontier, and Russell had a similar idea for contracts with the U.S. Government for fast mail delivery. [6]

By utilizing a short route and using mounted riders rather than traditional stagecoaches , they proposed to establish a fast mail service between St. Joseph, Missouri, and Sacramento, California, with letters delivered in 10 days, a duration many said was impossible. The initial price was set at $5 per 1 ⁄ 2 ounce (14 g), then $2.50, and by July 1861 to $1. The founders of the Pony Express hoped to win an exclusive government mail contract, but that did not come about.

Russell, Majors, and Waddell organized and put together the Pony Express in two months in the winter of 1860. The undertaking assembled 120 riders, 184 stations, 400 horses, and several hundred personnel during January and February 1861. [7]



Andy Murray beats Juan Martin Del Potro in Rio tennis.

The players’ sheer desire has surely squashed any doubts over tennis’s rightful place at these Games, and Andy Murray hasn’t just hit the ball better than anyone else over the past week - he has also showed the intensity of his passion.

Murray outlasted Juan Martin del Potro in a 4hr 2min dogfight; a match so physical that it could have been staged alongside the judo and the taekwondo in the Carioca Arena. Admittedly, he probably had fewer miles in his legs coming in, having made short work of Kei Nishikori on Saturday while Del Potro contested another epic against Rafael Nadal. But then Murray had played three doubles matches as well. He needed every ounce of his innate stubbornness to come through by a 7-5, 4-6, 6-2, 7-5 margin.

I t was a scrappy match but an utterly compelling one. At times you wondered who would stagger over the line first, because Murray never quite had his full kitbag of shots working cleanly. In the first set, his serve was as notable an absentee as Pele at the torch-lighting ceremony. Even when he managed to locate it, for periods of the second set, he promptly lost power in his legs instead. Closing out a title had never seemed so agonising.

“Tonight's one of the hardest matches I've had to play for a big title,” said Murray afterwards. “The US Open final when I played Novak and won my first slam was very hard, but tonight I found it really difficult. Emotionally it was tough, physically it was hard. There were so many ups and downs in the match.”

If Max Whitlock could win two gold medals in a couple of hours at the gymnastics, Murray somehow felt short-changed with only one. Not even the marathon runners have to work hours like this.

T he match was only around 30 minutes old when Del Potro started puffing hard, and going on little walkabouts between points. But each time he bolted down an energy gel at a changeover, he found another burst of inspiration. Meanwhile, the match was turning into a battle of brains as well as stamina as Murray tried to avoid Del Potro’s earth-shaking forehand – which stands unrivalled as the most powerful groundstroke in the game – and locate his less lethal backhand instead.

At one stage in the fourth set we entered a parallel universe where Del Potro was dinking the ball back with backspin off both wings as Murray moved him around with chess-like slices of his own. It was another example of Murray’s MacGyver-like ability to find solutions on the hoof, which has dug him out of so many awkward spots in the past.