Hindu dating service

hindu dating service

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History of Hinduism denotes a wide variety of related Hindu denominations native to the Indian Subcontinent , most of whom live in modern-day Nepal and India . [1] Its history overlaps or coincides with the development of Indian religions since Iron Age India . It has thus been called the "oldest living religion" in the world. [note 1] Scholars regard Hinduism as a synthesis [2] [3] [4] of various Indian cultures and traditions, [3] [5] [2] with diverse roots [6] and no single founder or source. [7] [note 2]

Western scholars regard Hinduism as a fusion [2] [note 4] or synthesis [3] [note 5] of various Indian cultures and traditions. [3] [note 6] Among its roots are the historical Vedic religion of Iron Age India [15] [5] itself already the product of "a composite of the Indo-Aryan and Harappan cultures and civilizations", [16] [note 7] but also the Sramana [17] or renouncer traditions [5] of northeast India , [17] and mesolithic [18] and neolithic [19] cultures of India, such as the religions of the Indus Valley Civilisation , [20] Dravidian traditions, [21] and the local traditions [5] and tribal religions . [22]

From northern India this "Hindu synthesis", and its societal divisions, spread to southern India and parts of Southeast Asia . [31] [note 11] [note 12] [note 13] It was aided by the settlement of Brahmins on land granted by local rulers, [32] [33] the incorporation and assimilation of popular non-Vedic gods, [web 2] [34] [note 14] and the process of Sanskritization , in which "people from many strata of society throughout the subcontinent tended to adapt their religious and social life to Brahmanic norms". [web 2] [note 15] [35] This process of assimilation explains the wide diversity of local cultures in India "half shrouded in a taddered cloak of conceptual unity." [36]

James Mill (1773–1836), in his The History of British India (1817), distinguished three phases in the history of India, namely Hindu, Muslim and British civilisations. This periodisation has been criticised, for the misconceptions it has given rise to. Another periodisation is the division into "ancient, classical, medieval and modern periods", although this periodization has also received criticism. [37]

Romila Thapar notes that the division of Hindu-Muslim-British periods of Indian history gives too much weight to "ruling dynasties and foreign invasions," [38] neglecting the social-economic history which often showed a strong continuity. [38] The division in Ancient-Medieval-Modern overlooks the fact that the Muslim-conquests took place between the eight and the fourteenth century, while the south was never completely conquered. [38] According to Thapar, a periodisation could also be based on "significant social and economic changes," which are not strictly related to a change of ruling powers. [39] [note 16]

Smart and Michaels seem to follow Mill's periodisation, while Flood and Muesse follow the "ancient, classical, mediaeval and modern periods" periodisation. An elaborate periodisation may be as follows: [12]

Notes Smart [u] and Michaels [v] seem to follow Mill's periodisation (Michaels mentions Flood 1996 as a source for "Prevedic Religions". [w] ), while Flood [x] and Muesse [y] [z] follow the "ancient, classical, mediaeval and modern periods" periodisation. [aa]

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History of Hinduism denotes a wide variety of related Hindu denominations native to the Indian Subcontinent , most of whom live in modern-day Nepal and India . [1] Its history overlaps or coincides with the development of Indian religions since Iron Age India . It has thus been called the "oldest living religion" in the world. [note 1] Scholars regard Hinduism as a synthesis [2] [3] [4] of various Indian cultures and traditions, [3] [5] [2] with diverse roots [6] and no single founder or source. [7] [note 2]

Western scholars regard Hinduism as a fusion [2] [note 4] or synthesis [3] [note 5] of various Indian cultures and traditions. [3] [note 6] Among its roots are the historical Vedic religion of Iron Age India [15] [5] itself already the product of "a composite of the Indo-Aryan and Harappan cultures and civilizations", [16] [note 7] but also the Sramana [17] or renouncer traditions [5] of northeast India , [17] and mesolithic [18] and neolithic [19] cultures of India, such as the religions of the Indus Valley Civilisation , [20] Dravidian traditions, [21] and the local traditions [5] and tribal religions . [22]

From northern India this "Hindu synthesis", and its societal divisions, spread to southern India and parts of Southeast Asia . [31] [note 11] [note 12] [note 13] It was aided by the settlement of Brahmins on land granted by local rulers, [32] [33] the incorporation and assimilation of popular non-Vedic gods, [web 2] [34] [note 14] and the process of Sanskritization , in which "people from many strata of society throughout the subcontinent tended to adapt their religious and social life to Brahmanic norms". [web 2] [note 15] [35] This process of assimilation explains the wide diversity of local cultures in India "half shrouded in a taddered cloak of conceptual unity." [36]

James Mill (1773–1836), in his The History of British India (1817), distinguished three phases in the history of India, namely Hindu, Muslim and British civilisations. This periodisation has been criticised, for the misconceptions it has given rise to. Another periodisation is the division into "ancient, classical, medieval and modern periods", although this periodization has also received criticism. [37]

Romila Thapar notes that the division of Hindu-Muslim-British periods of Indian history gives too much weight to "ruling dynasties and foreign invasions," [38] neglecting the social-economic history which often showed a strong continuity. [38] The division in Ancient-Medieval-Modern overlooks the fact that the Muslim-conquests took place between the eight and the fourteenth century, while the south was never completely conquered. [38] According to Thapar, a periodisation could also be based on "significant social and economic changes," which are not strictly related to a change of ruling powers. [39] [note 16]

Smart and Michaels seem to follow Mill's periodisation, while Flood and Muesse follow the "ancient, classical, mediaeval and modern periods" periodisation. An elaborate periodisation may be as follows: [12]

Notes Smart [u] and Michaels [v] seem to follow Mill's periodisation (Michaels mentions Flood 1996 as a source for "Prevedic Religions". [w] ), while Flood [x] and Muesse [y] [z] follow the "ancient, classical, mediaeval and modern periods" periodisation. [aa]