Matt damon dating history

matt damon dating history

It seemed just yesterday that dreamboat Matt Damon seemed slightly less dreamy after he told an African American producer she need not worry about diversity.

“It seems like you would undermine what the competition is supposed to be about, which is about giving somebody this job based entirely on merit,” he said on his HBO show “Project Greenlight,” in which newbies compete for a chance to make a $3 million movie.

Damon later walked back what was sarcastically hash-tagged “Damonsplaining,” saying he believes “deeply that there need to be more diverse filmmakers making movies.”

“I think you’re a better actor the less people know about you period,” he told the Guardian  in a piece published Sunday while pushing his new film “The Martian. “And sexuality is a huge part of that. Whether you’re straight or gay, people shouldn’t know anything about your sexuality because that’s one of the mysteries that you should be able to play.”

“It’s just like any piece of gossip,” Damon said . “… and it put us in a weird position of having to answer, you know what I mean? Which was then really deeply offensive. I don’t want to, like [imply homosexuality is] some sort of disease — then it’s like I’m throwing my friends under the bus.”

Then, Damon appeared to take a shot of sorts at Rupert Everett, an openly gay actor whose star has faded since he went public about his sexual orientation.

“At the time, I remember thinking and saying, Rupert Everett was openly gay and this guy – more handsome than anybody, a classically trained actor – it’s tough to make the argument that he didn’t take a hit for being out,” Damon said.

We were taking a break from filming a really pivotal scene in Good Will Hunting, and Matt Damon and Gus Van Sant, the director, were having an intense chat about the script – they changed a lot of it as we went along and they often broke off to have serious discussions. I think I'm laughing at Ben Affleck, who was just out of frame – he is a very funny guy. This scene was important; it is the moment where Skylar, my character, keeps asking Will Hunting, Matt's character, how he can do her organic chemistry paper in five seconds flat, when it takes her four weeks to figure it out.

Matt had been at Harvard, and the idea for Good Will Hunting came out of a writing assignment – Will Hunting is a genius who is forced to see a therapist, played by Robin Williams, and study advanced mathematics with a renowned professor, played by Stellan Skarsgård, in order to avoid going to jail. He and Ben developed the script purely so they could have a shot at being actors. At this point they were completely unknown, but I had left drama school at 21 and made Circle of Friends (1995), Big Night and Sleepers (both 1996) and Grosse Pointe Blank (1997), which was just out and quite a big hit, so I was on a bit of a roll.

When the film came out in January 1998, it was a huge success; it earned more than $10 million on the opening weekend and we were nominated for nine Oscars, winning two, for Best Supporting Actor for Robin Williams and Best Original Screenplay for Ben and Matt. Suddenly the interest in Matt and me as a couple went bonkers. But then we split up very publicly that April, which was grim, and it turned from this beautiful thing into something so dark. I'm always really sad that we didn't stay friends because it was absolutely incandescent making that film. It was a beautiful experience and I'm so proud of that time.

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Matt Damon Dating History - FamousFix

We were taking a break from filming a really pivotal scene in Good Will Hunting, and Matt Damon and Gus Van Sant, the director, were having an intense chat about the script – they changed a lot of it as we went along and they often broke off to have serious discussions. I think I'm laughing at Ben Affleck, who was just out of frame – he is a very funny guy. This scene was important; it is the moment where Skylar, my character, keeps asking Will Hunting, Matt's character, how he can do her organic chemistry paper in five seconds flat, when it takes her four weeks to figure it out.

Matt had been at Harvard, and the idea for Good Will Hunting came out of a writing assignment – Will Hunting is a genius who is forced to see a therapist, played by Robin Williams, and study advanced mathematics with a renowned professor, played by Stellan Skarsgård, in order to avoid going to jail. He and Ben developed the script purely so they could have a shot at being actors. At this point they were completely unknown, but I had left drama school at 21 and made Circle of Friends (1995), Big Night and Sleepers (both 1996) and Grosse Pointe Blank (1997), which was just out and quite a big hit, so I was on a bit of a roll.

When the film came out in January 1998, it was a huge success; it earned more than $10 million on the opening weekend and we were nominated for nine Oscars, winning two, for Best Supporting Actor for Robin Williams and Best Original Screenplay for Ben and Matt. Suddenly the interest in Matt and me as a couple went bonkers. But then we split up very publicly that April, which was grim, and it turned from this beautiful thing into something so dark. I'm always really sad that we didn't stay friends because it was absolutely incandescent making that film. It was a beautiful experience and I'm so proud of that time.

The Big Short, the film adaptation of Michael Lewis' book of the same name about the causes of the financial crisis, opens in UK cinemas this weekend. How will the story stack up against the greatest films about business?

Europe has been a place of battles and political intrigue for centuries. As we approach a vote on the UK's membership of the European Union, we look at what 50 writers, actors, historians, artists and comedians have said about Europe and its nations.